Category: enoshmink study

Marcelia cinema

Test certificate for BBC studio egypt

Test report

 

Clint:

        BBC complex studios in cairo

Test date:

June 14, 2014

Location:

 

Test method

It is based on ASTM E 90 standard

Project discretion

This is hotel based in Cairo Egypt and unique place in Cairo  nile view in agouza

outside noise was  normally 85 db and when the rash hour begging  it measurers 88 db and it is vary hi noise

And that use technique of wall damping construction for sound isolation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Test object

  • Measure inside studio background noise
  • Measure outside studio ( street traffic )
  • Compere the measurements with the standard

 

Description of test

                      

Instruments:  sound level meter paa3 S/N 00380650

ACOUSTICAL calibrator B&K S/N 1897713

PAA3 SOFTWARE

HP I7     laptop

Test procedures 

Closing all the doors and start test with

 

SPL meter

RT 60

                          Space and time average

  • Average 6 meter from entrance door
  • Average 300 sec time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Test investigation

Audio booth

First test inside the door of the studio and location of test in center of the space and open the window

it measures

 

And measuring the back ground noise in the same place . with closing the window and Curtin

 

 

And measuring RT60

 

Second

Test outside lobby area (rooms)

Measuring in the rooms in third floor with dynamic range testing

 

Third

Test outside lobby area ( garage ) after lobby door to garage and with full loudspeaker power

Measuring that following

And RT60 for the air volume

 

 

 

And after closing the door of garage outside ( street)

Measuring as following ( with dynamic rage )

 

And that is show it noise from 100 hz to 1 khz related to traffic noise

 

The code and testing comparing

Project Design :: Hotel

Goal: To create an aesthetically pleasing and calming environment, which encourages guests to feel relaxed and comfortable so that they enjoy their stay and are more apt to return. To minimize noise from other guest rooms, the corridor and mechanical equipment.

  • Related Codes & Standards
    • Sound Transmission Class (STC)
    • Impact Insulation Class (IIC)
    • Universal Building Code/International Building Code (UBC/IBC)
  • Considerations
    • There are several issues that must be addressed concerning acoustics in a hotel project. These issues stem from the two types of sound that must be controlled: airborne sound and impact sound. A typical airborne sound is music or talking. A typical impact sound is the footfall sound of an upstairs guest.
    • There are two rating systems that compare the acoustic quality of various building assemblies. Both classify acoustical performance with a single number. In both cases, the higher the number, the better the sound isolation performance. Sound Transmission Class (STC) rates a partition’s resistance to airborne sound transfer.
    • The Uniform Building Code (UBC) contains requirements for sound isolation between dwelling units in Group R occupancy project (including hotels). However, these criteria are not universally enforced. UBC requires walls and floor/ceiling assemblies to have an STC rating of 50. The code also requires that floor/ceiling assemblies have an Impact Insulation Class rating of 50. *NOTE: Even if a particular municipality has not adopted this part of the code, it is still recognized as an industry standard minimum.
    • Resilient channel can be used to help improve the isolation quality of a wall. However, if artwork and/or headboards are mounted against the wall (as is often the case in a hotel), the effectiveness will be greatly diminished. Consider increasing the isolation through some other means (i.e., increased mass, increased air space, double or staggered stud walls, etc…).
    • All air-gaps and penetrations must be carefully controlled and sealed. Even a small air-gap can degrade the isolation integrity of an assembly.
    • The perimeter of the wall and any penetration must be sealed air-tight with a non-hardening acoustic sealant.
    • Avoid the installation of back-to-back penetrations (outlets, light switches, and phone jacks). Consider installing a putty pad to the back of all outlets in party walls.
    • Ideally, elevator shaft footings, floor pads, masonry shaft walls, elevator equipment mountings, etc. should be totally isolated from the building structure. Structure borne noise/vibration from elevator operation may be extremely annoying. Additionally, any penetration or air gap in or around the wall must be sealed airtight with a non-hardening acoustic sealant.
    • The building code (UBC) specifies that the entrance doors from interior corridors shall have an STC rating of 26 or higher. The higher the STC rating of the doors, the better the isolation. However, if the seal around and under the door is not maintained, selecting a high rated door is meaningless. Ideally, drop seals that seal to a threshold (not carpet) can be installed. An acoustically absorptive ceiling and carpet in the corridor will help to control the noise levels within the corridor.
    • The majority of noise concerns can be alleviated through proper space planning. Sensitive areas should not be located near potentially noisy areas. Potentially annoying sound transmission from floor to floor (for example, from a restroom or laundry facility above a bedroom) can be mitigated through the vertical mirror of spaces. Potentially noisy areas (such as elevators, vending rooms and laundry facilities) should not be adjacent to guest rooms.
    • Although the building code does not address plumbing noise, this issue can be a major source of noise complaints. Plumbing noise can be both airborne and structure borne. To reduce plumbing noise, pipes should be resiliently mounted, that is, adequately insulated from their supports. To further reduce plumbing noise, the pipes should be wrapped with pipe lagging material.
    • Any roof-mounted equipment should be analyzed for potential noise/vibration impact.
    • Consider the exterior noise impact to the guest rooms (such as a nearby airport or freeway). The majority of this noise is transmitted through the windows and P-Tac units. Upgrading these elements might be necessary.
    • Noise Criteria (NC) ratings can be used to specify the allowable background noise levels (not including activity noise from the occupants) within a given space. Recommended NC levels vary depending on the type of space and the listening requirements. The recommended NC level for a bedroom is NC 20-30. Most hotel air-conditioning systems produce noise levels well in excess of the recommendation. Additionally, HVAC noise can act as a masking system in hotel projects, raising the background noise level and thus reducing the awareness of transmitted noise. (NOTE: Obviously, this benefit only occurs when the system is on.) The equipment noise should not exceed NC 25-30 and the air noise of the HVAC system should not exceed NC 35.

Codes & Testing :: Sound Transmission Class (STC)

Code: STC rates a partition’s or material’s ability to block airborne sound.

Enforcement: Appendix Chapter 35 of the ’88 and ’91 UBC, Appendix Chapter 12, Division II of the ’94 and ’97 UBC will be contained in the forthcoming IBC. Although not all municipalities have adopted this appendix chapter, it is still recognized as an industry standard.

General Information: The Uniform Building Code (UBC) contains requirements for sound isolation for dwelling units in Group-R occupancies (including hotels, motels, apartments, condominiums, monasteries and convents).

UBC requirements for walls: STC rating of 50 (if tested in a laboratory) or 45 (if tested in the field*).

UBC requirements for floor/ceiling assemblies: STC ratings of 50 (if tested in a laboratory) or 45 (if tested in the field*).

* The field test evaluates the dwelling’s actual construction and includes all sound paths.

Definitions:

  • Sound Transmission Class rates a partition’s resistance to airborne sound transfer at the speech frequencies (125-4000 Hz). The higher the number, the better the isolation.

STC Strength: Classifies an assembly’s resistance to airborne sound transmission in a single number.

STC Weakness: This rating only assesses isolation in the speech frequencies and provides no evaluation of the barrier’s ability to block low frequency noise, such as the bass in music or the noise of some mechanical equipment.

Recommended Isolation Level
An assembly rated at STC 50 will satisfy the building code requirement, however, residents could still be subject to awareness, if not understanding, of loud speech. It is typically argued that luxury accommodations require a more stringent design goal (as much as 10dB better – STC 60). Regardless of what STC is selected, all air-gaps and penetrations must be carefully controlled and sealed. Even a small air-gap can degrade the isolation integrity of an assembly.

Codes & Testing :: Impact Insulation Class (IIC)

Code: IIC rates a floor/ceiling assembly’s ability to block impact sound.

Enforcement: Appendix Chapter 35 of the ’88 and ’91 UBC, Appendix Chapter 12, Division II of the ’94 and ’97 UBC will be contained in the forthcoming IBC. Although not all municipalities have adopted this appendix chapter, it is still recognized as an industry standard.

General Information: The Uniform Building Code (UBC) contains requirements for sound isolation for dwelling units in Group-R occupancies (including hotels, motels, apartments, condominiums, monasteries and convents).

UBC requirements for floor/ceiling assemblies: IIC ratings of 50 (if tested in a laboratory) or 45 (if tested in the field*).

* The field test evaluates the dwelling’s actual construction and includes all sound paths.

Definitions:

  • Impact Insulation Class (sometimes referred to as Impact Isolation Class) measures a floor/ceiling assembly’s resistance to the transmission of structure-borne or impact noise.

IIC Strength: Helps to rate structure-borne noise such as footfall, a chair dragging on the floor, or other realistic sounds in a single number.

IIC Weakness: Due to the nature of the testing procedure, almost any assembly with carpet will meet the IIC requirement. Meeting the IIC requirement does not ensure the control of footfall noise. Conversely, if an assembly does not meet the IIC requirement, it does not necessarily mean that there will be a footfall noise issue.

The tapping machine frequently used for this test is not designed to simulate any one type of impact, such as a male or female footsteps, nor to simulate the weight of a human walker. Thus the subjectively annoying creak or boom generated by human footfalls on a limber floor assembly may not be adequately evaluated by this method (American Society for Testing and Materials – ASTM, E 1007, 5.2).

Recommended Isolation Level
An IIC rating of 50 will satisfy the building code requirements. As with STC, it is typically argued that luxury accommodations require a more stringent design goal. Bare in mind, some floor assemblies rated as high as IIC 70 could still transfer noticeable footfall noise.

Recommended Isolation Level
An IIC rating of 50 will satisfy the building code requirements. As with STC, it is typically argued that luxury accommodations require a more stringent design goal. Bare in mind, some floor assemblies rated as high as IIC 70 could still transfer noticeable footfall noise.

ANSI  (recommendation) .

Hotels/Motels
          Individual rooms or suites 40-45 (db)
          Meeting/banquet rooms 40-45 (db)
          Halls, corridors, lobbies 45-50 (db)
          Service/support areas 60-65 (db)

 

And for the clubs

The noise levels in clubs ranges between  95-98 dB(A) region

Ground type., the exposure times and frequency of exposure and the proportion of attenders vs. non-attenders . According to all the previous factors a test must be  retake Loud speakers will be relocated  according to the wind direction , to reach the standards levels .

 

 

Conclusion

  • All the door must retreated with new gasket
  • Must adding a threshold for main door and garage
  • All partitioning tested is meet E90 STARNDRD
  • Traffic and train noise totally sound isolated

*The test result  apply to the time of test (from 5 pm to 10 pm ) we will not be responsible for any other test done out of the above time frame.

 

This study made under American standard test method  

Dr. Ibrahim Elnoshokaty.               

Acoustical consultant                   

 

Eng. Eslam Youssef                        Eng. Mohamed hamdi

  R & D engineer                       Test and measurement

                                                     Engineer

 

 

 

Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE